5 for FRIDAY: LEGO SETS

Every growing boy needs a hobby. For me, it’s Lego. I loved the toy as a child, before undergoing what Lego fandom refers to as ‘The Dark Ages’ when I was thirteen or fourteen– that period between discovering Lego and rediscovering it.

I rediscovered it a few years ago thanks to my kids: Luscious and I had bought Ms 15 some Duplo when she was a little sausage person, and passed it on to Master 12 when he became a little sausage person. Neither of them had really taken to it, until one day, when searching for a way to create a maze for the remote control T-Rex they were playing with, they brought it out.

“I wonder what they’d do with some real Lego?” I said to Luscious.
“You should nip down the ships and pick some up,” she replied. (He says, passing-the-blamingly).

Today, I have a collection that lies just short of 200 sets, and just north of 55,000 pieces. The children, meanwhile, have iPads and iPods, and laptops. I have displayed at the last 2 Bricktober exhibitions, and am currently working on my display for a third consecutive year, and have travelled to Melbourne to exhibit at their giant Brickvention exhibition. I am a member of several online Lego groups, have a Flickr account, and spend hundreds of dollars a year at the Bricklink second-hand site, buying individual pieces for my MOCs (My Own Creations: what adults call this thing wot I built all by myself to make it sound more adult).

In short, I’m an AFOL: an Adult Fan of Lego. And I loves it with great lovingness.

In many ways, I’ve passed beyond buying sets: I’m more interested in MOCs, as it expands my creative skills, and it’s the act of artistic creation that fires my juices. But, like many of my colleagues, sets were where I started before I slid over to the more self-expressive, artistic end of the spectrum. So here are five sets that fuelled my love of the brick, and which will be the last to leave my cold, dead hands.

 

5 for Friday: Lego sets

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